AUDIO: Anatomy of a Panic Attack

Occurring without warning, the panic attack is a crippling and cruel symptom of many anxiety disorders. These debilitating episodes thrust individuals into intense bouts of terror, leaving them fighting to regain control of their own body.

The piece combines interview material recorded with a friend and abrasive sound design to pull the listener into the experience of a panic attack. It was produced as part of the Hubbub Relaxation / Cacophony tape, commissioned by the Wellcome Trust and featured during the Lates Spectacular event in September 2015.

Listen to the Relaxation / Cacophony Tape in full here: www.inthedarkradio.org/the-dark-room…e-collection/

Image: cristina – www.flickr.com/photos/cristinafo…rafia/5025559787/

Audio: Oxford Sparks – Big Questions Podcast

The University of Oxford’s Big Questions podcast which I’ve been producing is now available online to listen to!

Each episode features narration from Chris Lintott and explores a ‘big theme’ in science, from matters of scale to hidden worlds. Featuring interviews with scientists from the University of Oxford the series incorporates music and colourful sound design to bring concepts and details to life – have a listen to a couple of my favourite pieces below!

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or through their Soundcloud page. Episodes are available both in feature length (30 mins) and as individual parts (three per episode)!

Audio: The History and Development of Chemotherapy Drugs

Distillations Podcast: The History and Development of  Chemotherapy Drugs

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Back over the summer I recorded an interview with Dr Viviane Quirke of Oxford Brookes University about the history and development of cancer chemotherapy drugs. The piece was recorded for the Chemical Heritage Foundation’s brilliant and award winning podcast ‘Distillations’ – which has sadly now come to an end.

The piece was edited by Mia Lobel and can be listened here:

http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/media/distillations/181-chemotherapy.aspx

The episode also features a very personal story by producer Christine Laskowski who looks at her father’s cancer treatment with a drug called Cisplatin – a drug that was developed in the 1970s and despite very nasty side-effects – is still used to treat cancer today.

If you don’t already listen to the podcast, it’s well worth checking out the Distillations back catalogue – with close to 200 episodes – there’s some great stuff there waiting to be listened to: http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/media/distillations/index.aspx

Podcast for D&AD: Imagined Landscapes

Inspired by Audio

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Over the last year In The Dark has been digging into it’s library of audio shorts to pull together a series of curated podcasts for the D&AD Inspired by Audio website. The idea  behind this has been to introduce new audiences to some of our favourite audio shorts and give them an idea of what can be achieved through creative audio production. If you’ve never been to one of our events before, these podcasts will give you a good sense of the material we play.

So far we’ve  explored the ‘Sound of Music‘, what’s ‘Inside Your Head‘ and most recently I produced an episode exploring the use of sound and story telling to create ‘Imagined Landscapes‘.

Each episode is presented by Nina Garthwaite and produced by a different member of In the Dark, you can find the full collection featured at the bottom of the Inspired by Audio website.

Imagined Lanscapes

Creating a sense of place through sound can often help us connect with the human stories that are so strongly tied to our surroundings.

In this episode producers have used sound in different ways to provide colour and personality to the spaces that they’re exploring, from the dark soundscapes of an abandoned prison to the vibrant musicality of a Baltimore cityblock.

So close your eyes and take a trip across some sonic terrain…

Listen / download HERE

Playlist:

A Sense of Place – Tony Hill

Through a Door – Sarah Boothroyd

Out of the Blocks – Aaron Henkin and Wendel Patrick

The Dustbin Man Cometh – Ed Prosser

Pod Academy – In The Morgue

I’ve recently started producing podcasts for a new non-profit organisation called Pod Academy – they release weekly podcasts on academia and research, covering everything from the arts and culture to science and the environment. There’s a really nice range of subjects covered by the podcasts and their library is growing on a weekly basis. You can browse what they have to offer here.

Auto-erotic Asphyxiation

My latest offering takes a trip around the morgue of the Sunderland Royal Infirmary, with pathologist Dr Stuart Hamilton as a guide. The piece provides a glimpse into mortuary life,  from working with the dead on a daily basis, to dealing with cross dressing ‘auto-erotic asphyxiation’ fatalities.

You can listen to the piece over at the Pod Academy website here. Or download it here. The piece takes material recorded for my larger documentary piece ‘The D-Word’.

If you want to stay up to date with the podcasts you can subscribe to their podcast feed via iTunes.

Sounds of Science #03

EchoBank


In this Episode I visit Dr Kate Jones at the Zoological Society of London to find out about a bat call reference library they’re developing called ‘Echobank’ which is being used in conjunction with the iBats monitoring program. Scientists at the Zoological Society of London are using Echobank to teach a neural network to identify specific bat species from the acoustic properties of their calls.

Although this may sound pretty niche, it’s really cool stuff because the technology has much wider applications. Firstly the team are using it in combination with a smart phone app which can be used by anyone to take bat call recordings. In doing this the team hope to collect global distribution data for bat populations, which Dr Jones is hoping to use to determine whether bats can be used as a ‘heart monitor’ for the state of the environment. As bats represent one fifth of all mammalian species and exist in a huge range of habitats (from your local park to the tropics), changes in their global distribution could be used to monitor the impact of climate change on the natural world.

Secondly, the team are doing a lot of really important science engagement, working with ‘citizen science’ networks across Europe to gather data on bat populations. The team have been helping groups across Europe to develop and carry out their own monitoring programs, which feed data back to the iBats program. What’s great about this work is that it’s not only efficiently collecting distribution data, but also getting people interested in the state of their local environment. Standardisation is obviously an important factor when collecting data from multiple sources and with this in mind the team have developed the smartphone apps which can be used easily to take recordings and GPS data.

Finally (and what really excited me) was the suggestion that this ‘digital infrastructure’ could one day be adapted to identify any sound producing species from a recording taken on a smartphone. So imagine going out to your local park, taking a recording of a bird on your iPhone and getting probability results back on the identification of the species!

You can listen to the episode here:

Download it here

Or listen to the edited version as part of Short Science episode 89

Special thanks to Katie Draper who helped out with this episode!